Why Am I Not Done Yet?…

The Future Is What You MakeHello Dear Reader!

As I write this, I have another tab open of my other writing project that I keep finding myself rewriting over and over. It is eternally frustrating.😞

I do believe that I have mentioned this project in passing but here it is.  I am trying to write a show based on a wonderful book that I read a few years ago. I hesitate to name the book because I haven’t got permission yet. The author lives in Oakland, so I think I may be able to send the script once it is done.  I think the phrase that comes to mind is: It’s easier to ask for forgiveness than permission.  One of the main reasons that I loved the book so much was because it honors strong women.  The main character is a woman embarking on a new life and it has a great cast of strong women and a small handful of supporting men. 👍 The beauty with which these places and scenes is described is so poetic and clear that I can easily see this on a stage.👀

My problem, Gentle Reader, is that I can’t seem to create dialogue that fills in some of the spaces of back story in a clear concise way so I can move on with the main story, as the book is in three parts that interweave past and present.😥

I know, I should just write it and set it aside and come back to it later for editing. I should do that. But since this type of writing isn’t quite my discipline I am having on hell of a time “letting go.”

My aim was to have a rough draft completed by the end of the month, which was part of the reason that I haven’t posted since the beginning of the year. I am, sadly, only about 20-odd pages in and believe that this script could easily hit over 100. The book itself is about 300 pages and there is a lot of story that I need to leave out. Unless I can easily tie it all in quickly which is where I am at now. Not to mention, I have rewritten the second scene four times and am still not happy with it. 

Now that I am sitting here and thinking this out with all of you, I think I may have to change up my tactic and try writing this scene by scene and out of order. Just for now until I get through the story then put it all together. Doing it this way, I may still hit my goal of having a rough draft completed!

Oh, Dear Reader!  Thank you.  😜That was incredibly helpful.  If I get some more progress done, I may possibly post a page for your perusal as thanks.

Well, with this newfound inspiration, I am back to my untitled project!😌

Until next time…

It’s Child’s Play… I Mean A Child’s Play…

My latest project, Christmas Mouse, is a children’s play.  I have never actually had the chance to do a show like this. Like the movie, Child’S Play, there is the sense of “awwww, that’s cute” and “OMG, this is terrifying!”

Let me try and explain…
I enjoy working with kids. Before our contract expired, I volunteered with Zohar teaching dances to kindergartners. I loved dancing with these little ones as the first thing I did on Thursday mornings. When I was first brought on board, the kids were shy and some opted to watch from the side of the room. I totally get that. Meeting new people is hard and if you don’t do it often, it is hard to get the hang of. Hell, I still get like that a lot of the time, especially during orientations for new shows.

The terror thing that gets me is that we don’t have weeks to get the children that come to the show to get over shyness. We have minutes. Before each show, I get so nervous for that very reason. What happens if the children don’t join in the participartory sections? What happens if the children get bored and want to go? After the initial wave of panic is done washing over me, I can shake it off and refocus.

Then, after the curtain speech, when the kids actually talk back to me, I feel so much more excited and excitable. Sunday’s audience was outstanding. Lots of people, that are responsive and in good spirits, always make for a better show.

Next, the narrator comes out and begins the show. It never fails that the little ones love being recognized and offered the chance to participate in the show. So all my worrying was completely pointless. Now the “awwww’s” have kicked in. Getting to hear them cheering on our protagonists reminds me of how much fun it is to mix kids and the Arts.

Our first weekend was really fun as we got used to having an audience. I am hopeful that our second weekend of audiences enjoy this adorable show and we are sold out.

So, like I said, it IS like the movie. Just in a very different way.

A Christmas Mouse plays thru Sunday, 12/15 in Santa Clara. You can get you tickets by calling 408.248.7993. Bring the kiddies and enjoy a little holiday fun.

Just Announced…The 2011 Tony Award Nominations!!

Book of Mormon leads the nominations with 14!!

Okay everyone, this is one of the events that I wait for every year!  Here is the full list of the nominees.  If you just want a breakdown of how many each show got, just scroll to the end of the post.

The Tony Awards will be aired on June 12 @ 8:00 PM from their new home in the Beacon Theatre. Drumroll please….

Best Play

Good People
Author: David Lindsay-Abaire

Jerusalem
Author: Jez Butterworth

The Motherf**ker with the Hat
Author: Stephen Adly Guirgis

War Horse
Author: Nick Stafford

Best Musical

The Book of Mormon
Catch Me If You Can
The Scottsboro Boys
Sister Act

Best Book of a Musical

Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson
Alex Timbers

The Book of Mormon
Trey Parker, Robert Lopez and Matt Stone

The Scottsboro Boys
David Thompson

Sister Act
Cheri Steinkellner, Bill Steinkellner and Douglas Carter Beane

Best Original Score (Music and/or Lyrics) Written for the Theatre

The Book of Mormon
Music & Lyrics: Trey Parker, Robert Lopez and Matt Stone

The Scottsboro Boys
Music & Lyrics: John Kander and Fred Ebb

Sister Act
Music: Alan Menken
Lyrics: Glenn Slater

Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown
Music & Lyrics: David Yazbek

Best Revival of a Play

Arcadia
The Importance of Being Earnest
The Merchant of Venice
The Normal Heart

Best Revival of a Musical

Anything Goes
How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Play
Brian Bedford, The Importance of Being Earnest
Bobby Cannavale, The Motherf**ker with the Hat
Joe Mantello, The Normal Heart
Al Pacino, The Merchant of Venice
Mark Rylance, Jerusalem

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Play
Nina Arianda, Born Yesterday
Frances McDormand, Good People
Lily Rabe, The Merchant of Venice
Vanessa Redgrave, Driving Miss Daisy
Hannah Yelland, Brief Encounter

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Musical
Norbert Leo Butz, Catch Me If You Can
Josh Gad, The Book of Mormon
Joshua Henry, The Scottsboro Boys
Andrew Rannells, The Book of Mormon
Tony Sheldon, Priscilla Queen of the Desert

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Musical
Sutton Foster, Anything Goes
Beth Leavel, Baby It’s You!
Patina Miller, Sister Act
Donna Murphy, The People in the Picture

Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Play
Mackenzie Crook, Jerusalem
Billy Crudup, Arcadia
John Benjamin Hickey, The Normal Heart
Arian Moayed, Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo
Yul Vázquez, The Motherf**ker with the Hat

Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Play
Ellen Barkin, The Normal Heart
Edie Falco, The House of Blue Leaves
Judith Light, Lombardi
Joanna Lumley, La Bête
Elizabeth Rodriguez, The Motherf**ker with the Hat

Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Musical
Colman Domingo, The Scottsboro Boys
Adam Godley, Anything Goes
John Larroquette, How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying
Forrest McClendon, The Scottsboro Boys
Rory O’Malley, The Book of Mormon

Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Musical
Laura Benanti, Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown
Tammy Blanchard, How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying
Victoria Clark, Sister Act
Nikki M. James, The Book of Mormon
Patti LuPone, Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown

Best Scenic Design of a Play
Todd Rosenthal, The Motherf**ker with the Hat
Rae Smith, War Horse
Ultz, Jerusalem
Mark Wendland, The Merchant of Venice

Best Scenic Design of a Musical
Beowulf Boritt, The Scottsboro Boys
Derek McLane, Anything Goes
Scott Pask, The Book of Mormon
Donyale Werle, Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson

Best Costume Design of a Play
Jess Goldstein, The Merchant of Venice
Desmond Heeley, The Importance of Being Earnest
Mark Thompson, La Bête
Catherine Zuber, Born Yesterday

Best Costume Design of a Musical
Tim Chappel & Lizzy Gardiner, Priscilla Queen of the Desert
Martin Pakledinaz, Anything Goes
Ann Roth, The Book of Mormon
Catherine Zuber, How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying

Best Lighting Design of a Play
Paule Constable, War Horse
David Lander, Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo
Kenneth Posner, The Merchant of Venice
Mimi Jordan Sherin, Jerusalem

Best Lighting Design of a Musical
Ken Billington, The Scottsboro Boys
Howell Binkley, How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying
Peter Kaczorowski, Anything Goes
Brian MacDevitt, The Book of Mormon

Best Sound Design of a Play
Acme Sound Partners & Cricket S. Myers, Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo
Simon Baker, Brief Encounter
Ian Dickinson for Autograph, Jerusalem
Christopher Shutt, War Horse

Best Sound Design of a Musical
Peter Hylenski, The Scottsboro Boys
Steve Canyon Kennedy, Catch Me If You Can
Brian Ronan, Anything Goes
Brian Ronan, The Book of Mormon

Best Direction of a Play
Marianne Elliott and Tom Morris, War Horse
Joel Grey & George C. Wolfe, The Normal Heart
Anna D. Shapiro, The Motherf**ker with the Hat
Daniel Sullivan, The Merchant of Venice

Best Direction of a Musical
Rob Ashford, How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying
Kathleen Marshall, Anything Goes
Casey Nicholaw and Trey Parker, The Book of Mormon
Susan Stroman, The Scottsboro Boys

Best Choreography
Rob Ashford, How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying
Kathleen Marshall, Anything Goes
Casey Nicholaw, The Book of Mormon
Susan Stroman, The Scottsboro Boys

Best Orchestrations
Doug Besterman, How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying
Larry Hochman, The Scottsboro Boys
Larry Hochman and Stephen Oremus, The Book of Mormon
Marc Shaiman & Larry Blank, Catch Me If You Can
Recipients of Awards and Honors in Non-competitive Categories

Special Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Theatre
Athol Fugard
Philip J. Smith

Regional Theatre Tony Award
Lookingglass Theatre Company (Chicago, Ill.)

Isabelle Stevenson Award
Eve Ensler

Special Tony Award
Handspring Puppet Company

Tony Honor for Excellence in the Theatre
William Berloni
The Drama Book Shop
Sharon Jensen and Alliance for Inclusion in the Arts

Tony Nominations by Production
The Book of Mormon – 14
The Scottsboro Boys – 12
Anything Goes – 9
How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying – 8
The Merchant of Venice – 7
Jerusalem – 6
The Motherf**ker with the Hat – 6
The Normal Heart – 5
Sister Act – 5
War Horse – 5
Catch Me If You Can – 4
Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo – 3
The Importance of Being Earnest – 3
Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown – 3
Arcadia – 2
Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson – 2
Born Yesterday – 2
Brief Encounter – 2
Good People – 2
La Bête – 2
Priscilla Queen of the Desert – 2
Baby It’s You! – 1
Driving Miss Daisy – 1
The House of Blue Leaves – 1
Lombardi – 1
The People in the Picture – 1

 Did any of these shock you?  Were you surprised that anyone wasn’t on this list?  Were you surprised they were?  Let me hear ya!